bikes.msu.edu msu.edu

Safety

Bike Safety Tips

The most important thing when it comes to being safe on your bike is avoiding an accident, particularly ones with motor vehicles that can be very serious. So, we want to first focus your attention on how you can best be seen while riding.

Be Seen with Lights & Bright Clothing

NiteRider Mako 2Watch this video to understand why it’s important to stand out from your environment. Trust me, you DON’T want to be the bear if a car driver doesn’t notice you. Wear the brightest clothing you can find; safety-vests rock if you’d rather not flip for a new jacket. We’re also very big on good lighting for your bike, especially if you commute or ride on the road (as you should) around campus. We stock a great selection of strong headlights and rear lights to fit any budget.A tail light is required by Michigan State Law when riding after dark, but if you ask any commuter or experienced bicyclist, they’ll advise you to run with tail and head lights (strobe is best) all day (use rechargeable batteries and you don’t have to worry about the expense of replacing batteries). Why use lights during the day? Well, when you ride in and out of dark shadowy areas of the roads you can become almost invisible to a motorist who’s eyes haven’t adjusted to the darkness in that split second which could cost you dearly.

Picking a Safe Route

sidewalk-cyclists

Over 90% of all reported bike accidents are the result of sidewalk bicycling on the MSU campus! (courtesy of MSU Photography Services)

Choosing a safe route is probably the most important key to your safety as a cyclist. Our biggest piece of advice: Stay off the sidewalks if you’re going more than 10 mph even if there are no bike lanes; you have a legal right to ride in the road (just make sure you’re highly visible, ride with the flow of traffic and follow the same rules of the road as motor vehicles). Cars just don’t check sidewalks for bicyclists when they approach a roadway to make a turn and, on our campus as with most of the cities in the State of Michigan you have NO LEGAL PROTECTION if you do get hit while riding your bike through a cross-walk as a pedestrian as you’re required to be walking your bike to be legally considered a pedestrian. National statistics as well as our own campus research show that the overwhelming majority of bike-auto accidents occur when the bicyclist is riding on a sidewalk. Below is a summary of a very convincing graphical presentation (read more here courtesy of John Allen’s Bicycle Facilities, Laws and Programs pages):”A seminal study published in the ITE Journal in September 1994 by Alan Wachtel and Diana Lewiston compared crash statistics with riding location and exposure (bicycle volume counts). The study clearly confirmed what many bicycle safety and transportation professionals had held for many years – that riding on a sidewalk is not necessarily safer and in fact, due to the inducement of bi-directional travel the risk is approximately four times that of riding on the roadway with traffic.”

If you’d like to learn more about why it’s safer to ride in the road and exactly WHERE to ride in the road you should review the great animations on this website courtesy of the folks at Commute Orlando.

Riding Safe Tips

Once you’ve got your basic safety equipment all set (see below for our recommendations), the next major area of keeping safe while you ride is how you ride and react to aggressive or clueless motorists/pedestrians/other cyclists. The Bicycle Safe website lists common types of bike-to-motorist accidents and how to avoid them. The League of Illinois Bicyclists has a video on the topic of riding safely and defensively on the roads.

If you’re interested in learning more about safe bike riding, consider taking a class from the MSU Bikes Service Center. We’re planning on offering some classes focused on this topic. Drop us an e-mail and get on our bike classes wait list at bikes@msu.edu.

Helmets

The Bike Helmet:  Cheap insurance.  Example of the kind of helmets we normally stock.

The Bike Helmet: Cheap insurance. Example of the kind of helmets we normally stock.

At the top of the list is head safety. We highly recommend the use of helmets when riding around campus – or anywhere, for that matter. We recently had a student with a helmet stop by the Service Center who shared one of the simplest summaries we’ve ever heard for why wearing a helmet makes sense:”When people say ‘helmets look stupid,’ I just say ‘Would you rather look stupid or be stupid?

Eye Protection

Protecting your eyes is highly recommended while you’re riding. Use tinted during the day and clear for riding after hours or in low-light conditions. Prices range from bargain basement on up.

MSU Bike Safety Video

Check out this bike safety video that a group of MSU Communications Arts students (directed by Katelyn Patterson, they were all volunteers on this project) created for AOP bike tours done in previous years. Using a bit of slap-stick humor hopefully makes the sometimes boring subject more entertaining.

Fenders

Using fenders will keep your tires from picking up road debris and throwing it in your eyes. Most people associate fenders with keeping water and mud off yourself, but overlook the protection they provide your eyes. We stock a good supply and variety of them.

Bells and Horns

Airzound air horn for bikes

The Airzound – a very loud horn that can be reinflated with any air pump.

Yes, we’re all about bells and horns, too. How many pedestrians, cyclists, motorists are busy talking on their cell phones or listening to their iPods or other radios? Get yourself a nice little bell for letting peds know you’re about to pass them and then consider something stronger like the AirZound Bike Horn for getting yourself noticed by motorists in no uncertain terms. We stock a good selection of bells and horns, including the AirZound.

Legal assistance and case studies

The League of Michigan Bicyclists has published a number of legal columns by two Michigan attorneys (Sarah W. Colegrove and Todd E. Briggs) who specialize in litigating bicycling-related cases. You can read those past columns and get their contact information here.

What to do when hit by a car

We have many bicyclists come into our shop having just had an accident and way too often they report not having reported the incident and telling the driver they’re OK and not getting names or anything only later to find out that they’re injured or that their bike is damaged beyond repair. Don’t let this happen to you.

The following list is excerpted from an LMB legal column in the site referenced above.

  • Don’t admit liability by stating the accident was your fault.
  • Call the police (911 if there are serious injuries) and make a report. The MSU Police non-emergency number is 517-355-2222 for non life-threatening injury accidents.
  • Get driver’s contact and insurance information.
  • Get witnesses’ statements and contact information.
  • Get the officer’s precinct number and contact information.
  • Seek immediate medical treatment for injuries.
  • Report incident to your auto insurance company.
  • Report incident to your homeowners/renters insurance company.
  • Take photos of crash scene, injuries and bicycle.
  • Request copy of police report.
  • Keep folder of all crash information (notes, receipts, log, insurance information, etc.)
  • Contact an attorney to advise you of your rights.

MSU’s commitment to improving traffic safety

In 1995, MSU’s administration made the decision to make improvements to campus roads to improve traffic safety. This has resulted in a drop in automobile-related accidents that result in injuries to approximately 90 percent fewer accidents as of the 2008 accident report. As a result, not only have hundreds of potential accidents been avoided, but MSU was awarded an Outstanding Contributions to Traffic Safety Award from the Governor’s Traffic Safety Advisory Commission in 2006. Click here to read the award announcement.

A new campus policy calling for their construction/ addition to all new road projects was also adopted at the same time to improve bicycling safety and reduce accidents with automobiles and pedestrians. MSU is approximately 60 percent done with installing bike lanes on all campus (MSU-controlled) roads as of the end of the 2012 construction season.

The All University Traffic and Transportation Committee was also formed to advise Dr. Fred Poston (VP of Finance and Operations) on traffic and transportation issues and serves as a way for the campus community to have input to the administration regarding related issues or concerns.

Questions or suggestions for more safety information?

We’d love to add more to this page. Have a story or a tip you’d like to share? Comment below or contact us at bikes@msu.edu



MSU Bikes
434 Farm Lane
Bessey Hall, Room B10
East Lansing, MI 48824

Phone: 517-432-3400
Fax: 517-432-2743
E-mail: bikes@msu.edu